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Micro frontends

ASSESS?

We've seen significant benefit from introducing microservice architectures, which have allowed teams to scale delivery of independently deployed and maintained services. However, teams have often struggled to avoid the creation of front-end monoliths—large and sprawling browser applications that are as difficult to maintain and evolve as the monolithic server-side applications we've abandoned. We're seeing an approach emerge that our teams call micro frontends. In this approach, a web application is broken up by its pages and features, with each feature being owned end-to-end by a single team. Multiple techniques exist to bring the application features—some old and some new—together as a cohesive user experience, but the goal remains to allow each feature to be developed, tested and deployed independently from others. The BFF - backend for frontends approach works well here, with each team developing a BFF to support its set of application features.

History for Micro frontends

Mar 2017
Assess?

We've seen significant benefit from introducing microservice architectures, which have allowed teams to scale delivery of independently deployed and maintained services. However, teams have often struggled to avoid the creation of front-end monoliths—large and sprawling browser applications that are as difficult to maintain and evolve as the monolithic server-side applications we've abandoned. We're seeing an approach emerge that our teams call micro frontends. In this approach, a web application is broken up by its pages and features, with each feature being owned end-to-end by a single team. Multiple techniques exist to bring the application features—some old and some new—together as a cohesive user experience, but the goal remains to allow each feature to be developed, tested and deployed independently from others. The BFF - backend for frontends approach works well here, with each team developing a BFF to support its set of application features.

Nov 2016
Assess?

We've seen significant benefit from introducing microservice architectures, which have allowed teams to scale delivery of independently deployed and maintained services. However, teams have often struggled to avoid the creation of front-end monoliths—large and sprawling browser applications that are as difficult to maintain and evolve as the monolithic server-side applications we've abandoned. We're seeing an approach emerge that our teams call micro frontends. In this approach, a web application is broken up by its pages and features, with each feature being owned end-to-end by a single team. Multiple techniques exist to bring the application features—some old and some new—together as a cohesive user experience, but the goal remains to allow each feature to be developed, tested and deployed independently from others. The BFF - backend for frontends approach works well here, with each team developing a BFF to support its set of application features.

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