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The information in our interactive Radar is currently only available in English. To get information in your native language, please download the PDF here.

Techniques

Reactive architectures

NOT ON THE CURRENT EDITION
This blip is not on the current edition of the radar. If it was on one of the last few editions it is likely that it is still relevant. If the blip is older it might no longer be relevant and our assessment might be different today. Unfortunately, we simply don't have the bandwidth to continuously review blips from previous editions of the radarUnderstand more
Nov 2016
trial?

We see continued adoption and success of reactive architectures, with reactive language extensions and reactive frameworks being very popular (we added several such blips in this edition of the Radar). User interfaces, in particular, benefit greatly from a reactive style of programming. Our caveats last time still hold true: Architectures based on asynchronous message passing introduce complexity and make the overall system harder to understand—it's no longer possible to simply read the program code and understand what the system does. We recommend assessing the performance and scalability needs of your system before committing to this architectural style.

Apr 2016
trial?
Nov 2015
assess?

The techniques of functional reactive programming have steadily gained in popularity over recent years, and we’re seeing increased interest in extending this concept to distributed systems architectures. Partly inspired by “The Reactive Manifesto”, these reactive architectures are based on a one-way, asynchronous flow of immutable events through a network of independent processes (perhaps implemented as microservices). In the right setting, these systems are scalable and resilient and decrease the coupling between individual processing units. However, architectures based entirely on asynchronous message passing introduce complexity and often rely on proprietary frameworks. We recommend assessing the performance and scalability needs of your system before committing to this as a default architectural style.

May 2015
assess?