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Techniques

Cloud lift and shift

May 2020
Hold?

It is rather curious, that after over a decade of industry experience with cloud migration, we still feel it's necessary to call out cloud lift and shift; a practice that views cloud simply as a hosting solution, resulting in the replication of an existing architecture, security practices and IT operational models in the cloud. This fails to realize the cloud's promises of agility and digital innovation. A cloud migration requires intentional change across multiple axes toward a cloud-native state, and depending on the unique migration circumstances, each organization might end up somewhere on the spectrum from cloud lift and shift to cloud native. Systems architecture, for example, is one of the pillars of delivery agility and often requires change. The temptation to simply lift and shift existing systems as containers to the cloud can be strong. While this tactic can speed up cloud migration, it falls short when it comes to creating agility and delivering features and value. Enterprise security in the cloud is fundamentally different from traditional perimeter-based security through firewalls and zoning, and it demands a journey toward zero trust architecture. The IT operating model too has to be reformed to safely provide cloud services through self-serve automated platforms and empower teams to take more of the operational responsibility and gain autonomy. Last but not least, organizations must build a foundation to enable continuous change, such as creating pipelines with continuous testing of applications and infrastructure as a part of the migration. These will help the migration process, result in a more robust and well-factored system and give organizations a way to continue to evolve and improve their systems.

Nov 2016
Hold?

As more organizations are choosing to deploy applications in the cloud, we're regularly finding IT groups that are wastefully trying to replicate their existing data center management and security approaches in the cloud. This often comes in the form of firewalls, load balancers, network proxies, access control, security appliances and services that are extended into the cloud with minimal rethinking. We've seen organizations build their own orchestration APIs in front of the cloud providers to constrain the services that can be utilized by teams. In most cases these layers serve only to cripple the capability, taking away most of the intended benefits of moving to the cloud. In this edition of the Radar, we've chosen to rehighlight cloud lift and shift as a technique to avoid. Organizations should instead look more deeply at the intent of their existing security and operational controls, and look for alternative controls that work in the cloud without creating unnecessary constraints. Many of those controls will already exist for mature cloud providers, and teams that adopt the cloud can use native APIs for self-serve provisioning and operations.

Jan 2015
Hold?

As cloud adoption grows we are unfortunately seeing a trend to treat the cloud as just another hosting provider. Cloud lift and shift is unfortunately being encouraged by large vendors re-branding existing hosting offerings as "cloud." Few of these offer any real flexibility or pay-as-you-use pricing. If you think you can move to the cloud without re-architecting, you are probably not doing it right.

Jul 2014
Hold?
As cloud adoption grows we are unfortunately seeing a trend to treat the cloud as just another hosting provider. Cloud lift and shift is unfortunately being encouraged by large vendors re-branding existing hosting offerings as "cloud." Few of these offer any real flexibility or pay-as-you-use pricing. If you think you can move to the cloud without re-architecting, you are probably not doing it right.
Jan 2014
Hold?