Enable javascript in your browser for better experience. Need to know to enable it? Go here.
Last updated : May 19, 2020
Not on the current edition
This blip is not on the current edition of the Radar. If it was on one of the last few editions it is likely that it is still relevant. If the blip is older it might no longer be relevant and our assessment might be different today. Unfortunately, we simply don't have the bandwidth to continuously review blips from previous editions of the Radar Understand more
May 2020
Hold ? Proceed with caution

We find that more and more organizations need to replace aging legacy systems to keep up with the demands of their customers (both internal and external). One antipattern we keep seeing is legacy migration feature parity , the desire to retain feature parity with the old. We see this as a huge missed opportunity. Often the old systems have bloated over time, with many features unused by users (50% according to a 2014 Standish Group report) and business processes that have evolved over time. Replacing these features is a waste. Our advice: Convince your customers to take a step back and understand what their users currently need and prioritize these needs against business outcomes and metrics — which often is easier said than done. This means conducting user research and applying modern product development practices rather than simply replacing the existing ones.

Nov 2019
Hold ? Proceed with caution

We find that more and more organizations need to replace aging legacy systems to keep up with the demands of their customers (both internal and external). One antipattern we keep seeing is legacy migration feature parity, the desire to retain feature parity with the old. We see this as a huge missed opportunity. Often the old systems have bloated over time, with many features unused by users (50% according to a 2014 Standish Group report) and business processes that have evolved over time. Replacing these features is a waste. Our advice: Convince your customers to take a step back and understand what their users currently need and prioritize these needs against business outcomes and metrics — which often is easier said than done. This means conducting user research and applying modern product development practices rather than simply replacing the existing ones.

Veröffentlicht : Nov 20, 2019
Radar

Download Technology Radar Volume 25

English | Español | Português | 中文

Radar

Stay informed about technology

 

Subscribe now

Visit our archive to read previous volumes