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Last updated : Apr 13, 2021
Not on the current edition
This blip is not on the current edition of the Radar. If it was on one of the last few editions it is likely that it is still relevant. If the blip is older it might no longer be relevant and our assessment might be different today. Unfortunately, we simply don't have the bandwidth to continuously review blips from previous editions of the Radar Understand more
Apr 2021
Trial ? Worth pursuing. It is important to understand how to build up this capability. Enterprises should try this technology on a project that can handle the risk.

When building Docker images for our applications, we're often concerned with two things: the security and the size of the image. Traditionally, we've used container security scanning tools to detect and patch common vulnerabilities and exposures and small distributions such as Alpine Linux to address the image size and distribution performance. But with rising security threats, eliminating all possible attack vectors is more important than ever. That's why distroless Docker images are becoming the default choice for deployment containers. Distroless Docker images reduce the footprint and dependencies by doing away with a full operating system distribution. This technique reduces security scan noise and the application attack surface. Moreover, fewer vulnerabilities need to be patched and as a bonus, these smaller images are more efficient. Google has published a set of distroless container images for different languages. You can create distroless application images using the Google build tool Bazel or simply use multistage Dockerfiles. Note that distroless containers by default don't have a shell for debugging. However, you can easily find debug versions of distroless containers online, including a BusyBox shell. Distroless Docker images is a technique pioneered by Google and, in our experience, is still largely confined to Google-generated images. We would be more comfortable if there were more than one provider to choose from. Also, use caution when applying Trivy or similar vulnerability scanners since distroless containers are only supported in more recent versions.

Oct 2020
Trial ? Worth pursuing. It is important to understand how to build up this capability. Enterprises should try this technology on a project that can handle the risk.

When building Docker images for our applications, we're often concerned with two things: the security and the size of the image. Traditionally, we've used container security scanning tools to detect and patch common vulnerabilities and exposures and small distributions such as Alpine Linux to address the image size and distribution performance. We've now gained more experience with distroless Docker images and are ready to recommend this approach as another important security precaution for containerized applications. Distroless Docker images reduce the footprint and dependencies by doing away with a full operating system distribution. This technique reduces security scan noise and the application attack surface. There are fewer vulnerabilities that need to be patched and as a bonus, these smaller images are more efficient. Google has published a set of distroless container images for different languages. You can create distroless application images using the Google build tool Bazel or simply use multistage Dockerfiles. Note that distroless containers by default don't have a shell for debugging. However, you can easily find debug versions of distroless containers online, including a BusyBox shell. Distroless Docker images is a technique pioneered by Google and, in our experience, is still largely confined to Google-generated images. We're hoping that the technique catches on beyond this ecosystem.

Nov 2018
Assess ? Worth exploring with the goal of understanding how it will affect your enterprise.

When building Docker images for our applications, we're often concerned with two things: the security and the size of the image. Traditionally, we've used container security scanning tools to detect and patch common vulnerabilities and exposures and small distributions such as Alpine Linux to address the image size and distribution performance. In this Radar, we're excited about addressing the security and size of containers with a new technique called distroless docker images, pioneered by Google. With this technique, the footprint of the image is reduced to the application, its resources and language runtime dependencies, without operating system distribution. The advantages of this technique include reduced noise of security scanners, smaller security attack surface, reduced overhead of patching vulnerabilities and even smaller image size for higher performance. Google has published a set of distroless container images for different languages. You can create distroless application images using the Google build tool Bazel, which has rules for creating distroless containers or simply use multistage Dockerfiles. Note that distroless containers by default don't have a shell for debugging. However, you can easily find debug versions of distroless containers online, including a busybox shell.

Veröffentlicht : Nov 14, 2018
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