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Who said technology isn't romantic?

“Matthew, could you make a phone call for me while I am driving?” I looked at her incredulously with a huge smile, “Of course, my darling, with pleasure.” I made the call.

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What is so significant about that? Two years ago — for the first time in my life — I had the opportunity to do something that people do every day. I called my son. I was so excited that I posted an article on LinkedIn. Since the first call, I have called my doctor, bank manager, handyman, colleagues, family and friends. Anyone.

 

This time, my partner asked me to make a phone call for her, because she trusted the technology. She knows it works.

 


The Live Caption on the Google Pixel phone translates the speech to text in real-time and accurately. I am able to simultaneously read what people are saying and respond to them in a way that is natural and fluid.

I am profoundly deaf since birth and had always worn hearing-aids, until 11 years ago when I was given a cochlear implant. It is an electronic device that stimulates the auditory nerve through electrodes placed in the cochlea of the inner ear. It has improved my hearing by 50%. 

 

Not only that, the processor has a Bluetooth feature which allows me to hear the sounds with clarity on any Bluetooth enabled device such as the phone, laptop and Smart TV. Listening to the new sounds also helps me to improve my speech.

 

Technology keeps improving my independence and quality of life. 

 

 

My partner and I met when she visited London, my hometown, from Paris during the pandemic between the lockdowns. She went back to Paris during the lockdowns, and we would speak to each other on the phone everyday. If it wasn’t for the Live Caption feature, I don’t think our relationship would have blossomed. 

 

Two years on, we moved in together in an apartment with wonderful views of the River Thames.

 

Who said technology isn’t romantic!

 

Disclaimer: The statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the positions of Thoughtworks.

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