Menú

La información en esta página no se encuentra completamente disponible en tu idioma de preferencia. Muy pronto esperamos tenerla completamente disponible en otros idiomas. Para obtener información en tu idioma de preferencia, por favor descarga el PDF aquí.

Técnicas

CI theatre

NOT ON THE CURRENT EDITION
This blip is not on the current edition of the radar. If it was on one of the last few editions it is likely that it is still relevant. If the blip is older it might no longer be relevant and our assessment might be different today. Unfortunately, we simply don't have the bandwidth to continuously review blips from previous editions of the radarUnderstand more
Nov 2017
Resistir?

We've long been advocates of continuous integration (CI), and we were pioneers in building CI server programs to automatically build projects on check-ins. Used well, these programs run as a daemon process on a shared project mainline that developers commit to daily. The CI server builds the project and runs comprehensive tests to ensure the whole software system is integrated and is in an always-releasable state, thus satisfying the principles of continuous delivery. Sadly, many developers simply set up a CI server and falsely assume they are "doing CI" when in reality they miss out on all the benefits. Common failure modes include: running CI against a shared mainline but with infrequent commits, so integration isn't really continuous; running a build with poor test coverage; allowing the build to stay red for long periods; or running CI against feature branches which results in continuous isolation. The ensuing "CI theatre" might make people feel good, but would fail any credible CI certification test.

Mar 2017
Resistir?

We've long been advocates of continuous integration (CI), and we were pioneers in building CI server programs to automatically build projects on check-ins. Used well, these programs run as a daemon process on a shared project mainline that developers commit to daily. The CI server builds the project and runs comprehensive tests to ensure the whole software system is integrated and is in an always-releasable state, thus satisfying the principles of continuous delivery. Sadly, many developers simply set up a CI server and falsely assume they are "doing CI" when in reality they miss out on all the benefits. Common failure modes include: running CI against a shared mainline but with infrequent commits, so integration isn't really continuous; running a build with poor test coverage; allowing the build to stay red for long periods; or running CI against feature branches which results in continuous isolation. The ensuing "CI theatre" might make people feel good, but would fail any credible CI certification test.